3 of the Best Careers for Aspiring Working Women and Entrepreneurs

What makes for the best careers for aspiring female entrepreneurs are the women behind that role; women aspire to do more than secretarial work or work in a sewing factory.

Working Women and Entrepreneurs - Women entrepreneurs gathered at a conference table for a luncheon
The 3rd Annual Success Women's Conference is coming August 24, 2017. image SWC

Have you ever wondered what the best careers are for aspiring working women and entrepreneurs? There are many choices but in some cultures, women are told how to live their lives and what careers are best suited for them.  

Who made this category limiting women to a specific kind of job and who says they are best for women? Well, I’m glad they are not the boss of me!

Are you familiar with the phrase, “the more money you earn, the happier you will be?” While money does bring in a certain material level of happiness, the ultimate reward is taking control of your own life.

Not only that but your career. The bonus is receiving a fair salary coupled with the possibility of cracking the ceiling. According to the Success Women’s Conference, women should “come together to be inspired, empowered, connected and recharged.” 

These women know the importance of meetings and hold annual conferences to acknowledge influential women in their communities as well as the online community of progressive and innovative women.

Entrepreneurs own specific traits

Although women of color are making their own way in this world, some people still hold to misconception women cannot be successful working women and entrepreneurs and females need to stick to the traditional career choices, such as nurses, and other stereotypical professions.

Times are changing… times have changed and the business world is booming. You can create a business online, a home-based business and still become a success.  You can take over an existing business and still become a successful entrepreneur.

When looking for a new career, job seekers turn instinctively to job recruiters as a source for advice and direction. According to a recent study by Monster.com, job recruiters claim certain traits are necessary to would-be and successful entrepreneurs desiring to run their own business.

The women of color hoping to become leading working women and entrepreneurs own specific characteristics which will influence what careers they choose.

4Motivation

Millions of women find the motivation to continue working well into earlier retirement years. They have a salary which allows them to maintain a level of independence and many are receiving two sources of income.

Survival is motivation enough, however, it’s essential to starting or operating your own business. You are the driving force behind your personal and business success.  You must be enthusiastic, optimistic and focus on future goals and achievements.

3Business Skills

What are business skills? Well, they are everything working women and entrepreneurs need to run a business essentially. Whether it is taking over, or starting from scratch, the business owner or entrepreneur should –

  • Own the ability to think on their feet
  • Make tough decisions 
  • Be risk tolerant 
  • Know how to change the fate of their business 

These skills are significant in all aspects as it will lead to either successes or failures.

2Flexibility and Open-Mindedness

Being flexible and open-minded leads to progress while operating a business. Most people only assume working women and entrepreneurs have tunnel vision. They may seem reserved, unmoved and not willing to take direction, however, this is far from true.

Budding entrepreneurs know what they want and realize elasticity and an open mind are critical traits. Without those characteristics, you will not be able to see things obvious to others. Bad judgment on your part could cause the business to suffer. 

This is particularly the case when managing your business. Management is leadership and the ability to delegate. Avoid being so controlling and untrusting that you can’t accept the collaboration efforts of others.

1Creativity and Persuasiveness

The working women and entrepreneurs who are driven will not stop until they get what they want. However, with each milestone met, they set another goal and keep it moving. These individuals are persuasive and persistent; two positive and strong selling skills.

Not only do they recognize the strength of a business, they know when to move on so they are not wasting precious time. Creativity is key to pursuing and obtaining golden opportunities. It allows entrepreneurs to “think outside the box.”

We see numerous companies and industries copy campaign strategies but there’s always something that makes them stand out. Each one is unique in some way. But what is the difference?

The level of creativity sets a company apart from the next. That’s what builds brands and reputations. Recognizing the accomplishments of promising women entrepreneurs provide a sense of self-satisfaction and raise confidence.

While you should own specific characteristics, the list goes on. No one said it was easy being a woman entrepreneur.

The best careers for working women and entrepreneurs

Are you working in a position that you’re passionate about? You can invent a position for yourself by filling an unmet need in your community. Many careers have come into existence within the last decade with this concept in mind, but here are three careers that stand out for working women of color.

Working Women and Entrepreneurs as Chief Executive Officer

You may think running an existing business is a simple task, however, that’s not quite true. As mentioned, working women and entrepreneurs will need certain characteristics to become successful. To become a CEO, you must be flexible, open-minded and willing to take risks.

The company or business you take over will want to know that you can adapt to changing situations and respond with sound decisions instantly. You want them to know certain risks will need to take place to achieve a better business model.

Women seem to be drawn to CEO positions as they are often managers and organizers. Not to say men can’t do it, but women have a more practical sense of solving problems and are future-focused and goal-minded rather than take “the here and now” attitude.

For example, Irene Rosenfeld, the Chairman, and CEO of Kraft Foods has been in the in the world’s second-largest food company for decades.

Surprising, not many people know much about her, but Ms. Rosenfeld took to the food and beverage industry about 30 years ago and continues to work in the field.

Her knowledge, understanding, and motivation to make people aware of healthy products in the industry lead her to the position that she currently holds.

Another great example of working women and entrepreneurs is Oprah Winfrey. Her career began long before being a host of The Oprah Winfrey Show. She is now the Chairwoman and CEO of Harpo Products and the Chairwoman, CEO, and CCO of the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN).

Oprah Winfrey’s net worth is the result of great entrepreneurship and leadership. As a woman, Oprah is not afraid of achieving her goals or creating and diversifying her energies and income. This is evident from her being also an actress, philanthropist, publisher, and producer.

Working Women and Entrepreneurs as Project Managers

A role requiring working women and entrepreneurs to use delegating and managing skills to achieve goals within a deadline. The key is multitasking. Women prove this skill vital to running a household where there are children involved. Think about it!

The stay-at-home wife doesn’t really stay at home. She takes care of the children, cooks, cleans, runs errands, checks homework assignments, maintains relationships, etcetera. She makes sure everything is in order while men do very little or nothing at all relative to running the homestead. 

Still today, some cultures practice this value. Nonetheless, women are considered the best multi-taskers.

Women like Chantel Barkum-Casey of Revamp Business Services pursue roles as project managers because of their ability to multitask. Project Managers are key players when it comes to keeping operations moving forward.

They are responsible for analyzing the business and adjust as needed. A project manager often supervises multiple companies, sometimes managing a region.

As career women, project managers contract their services to clients, thus making them successful individuals through advertising, marketing and branding their business. The decision to collaborate with entrepreneurs who have specific experience is a wise one.

Working Women and Entrepreneurs as Registered Nurses

A career as a Registered Nurse can provide a lucrative salary. Professions such as RNs are thought of as standard or traditional professions for women, however, more men are moving into the field of nursing. 

With that said, this is a career woman can take to the next level of entrepreneurship. Many Registered Nurses develop and manage their own nursing care facilities, ensuring plans, directing patient care attendants and their families in the proper care and handling of their loved ones.

Therefore, not only are the family members apart of the healing process, concerned medical groups take steps to improve and maintain a patient’s health as well. All these skills require management, decisiveness, creativity, and persuasiveness.

Outlook on working women and entrepreneurs

Women want the flexibility to work according to their busy schedules and to have a rewarding career plus have a life outside of work. As such, these careers give balance.

They allow enterprising women to oversee their own destinies while maintaining a position of management and control. Aspiring working women and entrepreneurs need that, and that’s why they reach for careers as CEO, Project Managers, and Registered Nurses.

Quotes about working women

“Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understanding the country.” Margaret Thatcher


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Image source:  Success Women’s Conference