With the president officially in office for 2017, Black men and women of color should be more open to the idea of becoming their own bosses.

Whenever I hear someone blaming their financial situations on other people or groan they can’t find a suitable position, I cringe. You, too? It drives me totally insane and I want to cry out loud.

Should you be thinking about Black entrepreneurship?

Did we not learned anything from our Black and Asian ancestors who farmed their land and sold their harvests to the town’s people? And what about the determined mother who scrubbed every day, cooking, doing laundry and floors for mere pennies?

It was our parents and our grandparents who set the tone for Black entrepreneurs and women of color today and we don’t even recognize it.

In the same way, our elders offered goods and services vital to the community, I feel anyone surviving this digital transformation, including teen entrepreneurs, should be thinking about black entrepreneurship.  You can earn a respectable living and give back to the communities.

You can start-up a lawn care, tutoring, catering business or a woman can launch a fashion blog and website.  A person can establish a business re-purposing old tires and pallets and turn them into marketable items or provide senior care services.

If you don’t feel comfortable with any of those suggestions, do you have a unique voice or a knack for making people laugh? Don’t underestimate these gifts as being insignificant as the results are clear as a new YouTube star is born every day.

We’re all born with a gift or at least, the capacity to develop unlimited skills during the course of our lives, which can be valuable to a group of people, businesses or organizations. Many entrepreneurial jobs are hobbies or passions which fill an unmet need.

Consequently, a woman of color or person of color can start a business with a mustard seed much like that of Omar Walters.

Who Is Omar Walters?

The Omar Walters success story was told by Black Enterprise as they were able to get the juicy details on his incredible journey.

As a child, Omar found cooking exhilarating and began cooking at home for his friends and family. In light of this, he started a small catering business, loaning his culinary skills out for events, parties and social functions.

Eventually, Omar Walters would “accidentally” start his private dining restaurant without any formal training as a chef. Through Omar’s catering business, he is asked to take charge of a private affair and the rest is history, my friends.

Omar Walters stands among numerous Black successful entrepreneurs or Black business owners; he’s currently the proud owner and chef at Omar’s Kitchen, a prestigious loft serving the elite fabulous Caribbean, Asian, Latin and European dishes, located in Tribeca, NY.

Who’s Rakia Reynolds in a nutshell

Every business has a story to tell whether it’s a good one or one the owner should never reveal. In either case, if you can’t retell a story effectively, then why tell it, right? Rakia Reynolds, an African-American woman, knows this and she has made a profitable business storytelling.

She uses her gift to bring inspiration to the world as the proprietor of Skai Blue Media. As a PR person, Rakia helped hundreds of people and companies turn their brand around with her approach to the public.

Supporting Black Entrepreneurs

It’s through innovation and technology that entrepreneurs can break from the “norm” and become independent black business owners.

By offering goods and services to the local and online communities, black men and black women entrepreneurs improve their quality of life, take control of their finances plus they experience more freedom.

There’s no doubt in my mind the business collaborations you make are one of the major keys to any successful black entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurship Is Good for the Economy

In spite of an unpredictable economy, African American entrepreneur ideas are responsible for many changes that you will see in the future.

The Center for American Progress reports between 1997 and 2013 businesses owned by African-American women saw an increase of a whopping 258% while Latina business owners grew by an impressive second of 180%. Asian women followed with 156% growth.

Inasmuch as enterprise creates opportunities for others, I won’t lie, the path is a lonely and imperfect one. Although this may be true, the rewards are well worth the long nights and maxed out credit cards.

The national score of Black women who established their own businesses is now earning in excess of $226.8 billion annual revenue, employing roughly one million and a half employees.

The breakthrough for women of color provides new jobs and services for others and, hopefully, the business collaborations will include other black business owners, in and out of the immediate circle. As a result of these women-owned business relationships, everyone makes a profit.

Final Note on Black Entrepreneurship

We as black people or women of color pursuing an entrepreneurship degree can learn a thing or two from previous generations. Forget to buy the latest phone on release date, and buying frozen greens when we can grow and sell our own.

If nothing else, support a black entrepreneur and stop playing games – take the time to read and learn how to develop new strategies for financial security.

Stop learning how to survive and learn how to live! With Donald Trump in office, we must watch everything and in particular, our spending (ball on a budget) and learn how to put away for a rainy day.

My best business advice is that of my father’s. If he told me once, he told me a thousand times, “Pay yourself first!”


Source: How Women of Color Are Driving Entrepreneurship https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/race/reports/2014/06/10/91241/how-women-of-color-are-driving-entrepreneurship/

Photo credit desktop nexus

You May Also Like